Right. So, is anyone else a bit bored?

Was anyone else bored by large parts of today? I was, and looking at the scorecard I have absolutely no reason to be anything other than full of adrenaline. Instead, I just feel “eh” and I don’t know why.

It wasn’t without incident. The period of play when Fidel Edwards steamed in, supported by Jerome Taylor at the other end, was West Indies’ most captivating of the series. Seven wickets, nearly 300 runs and yet I was left with a feeling that nothing memorable happened.

Perhaps it was that no England batsman “went on” to a hundred. Maybe it was West Indies’ laughably awful fielding. It could even just be a form of professional detraction from the emotions of watching your country play. But I’m unsettled by it and think it has more to do with knowing that, in spite of West Indies’ improved display, tomorrow England ought to blow them away. It is utterly depressing seeing West Indies in this state; watching Corey Collymore trundle in like a baying donkey. He was frighteningly quick a few years ago but stress fractures and other nasty injuries have taken their toll. Edwards was severely sharp but, as one “staff” member of the Windies party told me, they cannot risk him bowling more than five overs at a time.

As an England fan, I thought they were distinctly poor today. West Indies did put the ball in better areas (a phrase which, someone recently told me, is absolute nonsense: you can’t put a ball in more than one area at a time! Ah the pedantry of journalism) but England looked distracted and, well, a bit bored too.

Clearly I am talking a load of nonsense. Thoughts welcome.

Wake me up for the semi-finals!

Between being peeved, along the lines that Will has laid out below, and the sheer monotony, I have lost interest. Unless something amazing happens, I won’t be turning on the telly until Australia play England on Sunday night.

Well, tonight Ireland play South Africa, and if Ireland actually get close, you might want to comment here. Fulminate away.

Stephen Fleming Double Century Tribute Post and Open thread

The difficult-to-please types at Cricinfo clearly don’t care much for the artistry of Stephen Fleming, but I was well pleased to wake up to find that he had smited the South Africans. And if James Franklin can finish off his century this morning, that will be even better.

Rejoice in the suffering of South African cricket here, or South African fans are free to remonstrate. However, any complaints about the wrong-headedness of this post will be thoroughly ignored.

Help us. We’re bleeding boredom

Jolly splendid teams though they are, me and my boss are absolutely suicidally bored watching South Africa against New Zealand. We would welcome any amusing tales, jokes, limericks. I’ve resorted to whistling Rolf Harris tunes (I only know one), and mumbling nonsense. To make matters worse, the bloody clouds have lifted here in London and it’s horribly blue and sunny outside. How dare it be so inviting.

Help us.

Australia vs South Africa wrap

I’m not the only one bored with the VB series going this long. I listened to the radio for most of the day while watching the play, as I was getting close to an act of violence if I had to listen to any more of Tony Greig’s insufferable inanities. Peter Roebuck was clearly even more bored then I was since he was more keen on discussing his charitable foundation’s activities in Africa then the game, and he follows my lead in calling for the format to be scrapped.

The game itself was actually good, and Adam Gilchrist was back to his sparkling best, scoring 88 off just 66 balls, with 14 glorious boundaries. His innings was theoretically terminated by a mis-played pull shot, but the actual thing that got him out was the commentator’s curse; as he passed 80, they started talking about double-centuries. He admits he was thinking about it himself, so obviously he got out.

Ponting, Martyn and Hussey all tucked in as well against a very weak South African pace attack, and settled on 344. Chasing that monster of a total, South Africa were just on the edge of possibility until Mark Boucher got out after scoring an excellent 76. They ended up with 287 for 6, which is a huge score in itself.

So a pretty meaningless game in the great scheme of things, but an entertaining fixture, at least compared to what happened in Melbourne on Friday. The difference was that the pitch here was good.

Statistical oddity- Australia scored 344 for 7 in 50 overs, with only one 6 for the innings. And that didn’t come up till the 46th over. Australia scored 300 in 45 overs, without going over the rope once. Bizzare.